GUARANTEED GAZETTE

In This Issue

• Fun Facts

• Healthy Note

• Coronavirus Prevention

• 401(k)

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March 2020 Issue 30

Coronavirus Prevention & Treatment

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. However, as a reminder, CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.

• Stay home when you are sick.

• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

 CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a face mask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.

 Face masks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of face-masks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

 If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

 These are everyday habits that can help prevent the spread of several viruses.

Treatment:

There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19. People with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.

People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

1-833-GTS-TANK

Handwashing: Do’s and Don’ts

Hand-washing is an easy way to prevent infection. Understand when to wash your hands, how to properly use hand sanitizer.

Frequent hand-washing is one of the best ways to avoid getting sick and spreading illness. Find out when and how to wash your hands properly.

When to wash your hands

As you touch people, surfaces and objects throughout the day, you accumulate germs on your hands. You can infect yourself with these germs by touching your eyes, nose or mouth, or spread them to others. Although it’s impossible to keep your hands germ-free, washing your hands frequently can help limit the transfer of bacteria, viruses and other microbes.

Always wash your hands before:

* Preparing food or eating

* Treating wounds or caring for a sick person

* Inserting or removing contact lenses

Always wash your hands after:

* Preparing food

* Using the toilet, changing a diaper or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet

* Touching an animal, animal feed or animal waste

* Blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing

* Treating wounds or caring for a sick person

* Handling garbage

* Handling pet food or pet treats

* Also, wash your hands when they are visibly dirty.

How to wash your hands

It’s generally best to wash your hands with soap and water. Over-the-counter antibacterial soaps are no more effective at killing germs than is regular soap.

Follow these steps:

1.) Wet your hands with clean, running water — either warm or cold.

2.) Apply soap and lather well.

3.) Rub your hands vigorously for at least 20 seconds. Remember to scrub all surfaces, including the backs of your hands, wrists, between your fingers and under your fingernails.

4.) Rinse well.

5.) Dry your hands with a clean towel or air-dry them.

How to use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer

Alcohol-based hand sanitizers, which don’t require water, are an acceptable alternative when soap and water aren’t available. If you use a hand sanitizer, make sure the product contains at least 60% alcohol. Follow these steps:

Apply the gel product to the palm of one hand. Check the label to find out the appropriate amount.

* Rub your hands together.

* Rub the gel over all the surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry.

Keeping your surfaces clean:

The Environmental Protection Agency released a list of disinfectant products approved for use against COVID-19 on surfaces, including multiple products from brand such as Clorox and Lysol. Some of the specific products include Clorox toilet cleaner with bleach, Clorox disinfecting spray, Lysol disinfectant max cover mist, Lysol toilet bowl cleaners, and Lysol multi-surface cleaner and disinfectant spray.

An EPA spokesperson said the companies had to demonstrate their products are effective against viruses that are even “harder-to-kill” than the novel coronavirus. They also noted that any products without an EPA registration number haven’t been reviewed by the agency. It’s also recommended that consumers pay attention specifically to how long a disinfectant needs to stay on the surface to be effective.

“All the money in the world can’t buy you back good health.”  – Reba McEntire

“Health is the greatest gift, contentment is the greatest wealth.”  – Buddha

Fun Facts

200% more fecal bacteria on cutting boards than toilet seats.

Shaking hands exchanges more germs than kissing.

TV remote controls are a leading carrier of bacteria.

Most germs can stay alive on your hands for 3 hours.

Germs from flushing toilet can travel up to 6 feet.

Soap gets its name from the mythological Mount Sapo. Fat and wood ash from animal sacrifices were washed into the Tiber River, creating a cleaning agent that aided women doing their washing.

Handbags carry up to 10,000 bacteria per square inch and 30% have fecal bacteria.

A study of over 11,000 children deter-mined that an overly hygienic environment increases the risk of eczema and asthma.

• 1 in 5 people do not wash their hands.

Packaged bottles and cans are stored in all sorts of places and often their caps are licked by mice. That’s why they are a direct invitation to disease.

48.3% of the microbes found on the New York City subways do not match any type of known bacteria species.

Bacteria can grow and divide every 20 minutes. One single bacteria can multi-ply into more than eight million cells in less than 24 hours.

More than 50% of raw chicken contains the campylobacter bacteria, which causes more illness than salmonella.. Cook-ing chicken until it reaches a temperature of 70c (158F) can help to ensure that it’s safe to eat.

Plan for Retirement—401(k)

A 401(k) is a plan that lets you set aside money from your paycheck into a 401(k) account and invest it in the market. The idea is that the value of the stocks and bonds you invest in go up over the years you spend working, leaving you with a fluffy cushion of cash when you retire.

You don’t pay any federal tax on the money you set aside (or, when the market climbs, the money you earn) until you actually withdraw it. When you do take that money out, the tax rate at that time is the rate that applies. Your employer handles setting aside this money by automatically taking it out of your paycheck.

As of 2019, if you’re under age 50 have a 401(k) plan set up through your job, you can put up to $19,000 of what you get paid into your account. At age 50 and above, you can contribute up to $25,000

At Guaranteed Transport you are eligible for 401(k) after 90 days of employment. GTS has a 50% company match up to 6% of your income.

Why wait? Start investing today:

Online: Go to jhenroll.com

Call: 1-855-JHENROLL (543-6765)

Form: you can complete a form that will be faxed to John Hancock, contact Amy for details

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What are some of the offenses that require the suspension or revocation of any driver license?

Accumulation of points for traffic offenses occurring while operating any vehicle, such as speeding, careless driving, driving while intoxicated.

Driving any motor vehicle with a .08% or more Blood Alcohol Content (BAC), or if under 21 years old driving with a .02% or more BAC (administrative suspension/revocation).

• Driving without insurance (administrative suspension).

• Refusal to submit to chemical testing when requested to do so by law enforcement (one year administrative revocation).

Court-ordered suspension or revocation of license for a drug or alcohol related offense (Abuse and Lose administrative action against license).

• Examples of point system violations:

Drive While Disqualified – 2 points

Excessive Speeding – 3 points

Failure to Keep Right – 2 points

Failure/Improper Signal – 2 points

Following Too Close – 2 points

Improper Lane – 2 points

No Commercial Driver License – 2 points

A disqualification is a loss of only commercial driving privileges for a specified period of time. During a disqualification, if the driver is not otherwise suspended or revoked, he or she can continue to drive private (non-commercial) motor vehicles without obtaining limited driving privileges.

A driver may be disqualified for the following convictions:

Failure to Appear Disqualification (Non-Member States)

The “non-member states” (those that are currently not a member of the Driver License Compact) are Alaska California, Michigan, Montana, Oregon, and Wisconsin. If a Missouri CDL driver fails to appear in court or pay for a traffic ticket received in a non-member state, Missouri will disqualify the driver upon notification from that state. The disqualification will remain in effect until Missouri receives notification that the driver has satisfied the ticket.

60 Days Disqualification

Two serious traffic convictions within three years if person is a CDL holder or if person is operating a CMV. Note: The three-year period will be based on violation date rather than conviction date. Serious traffic convictions include reckless driving, speeding 15 mph or more above the posted speed limit, improper or erratic lane changes, following too closely, any moving violation relating to a fatal crash, driving a CMV without obtaining a CDL, driving a CMV without CDL in possession, and driving a CMV without proper class of CDL or endorsement/restrictions.

One railroad-highway grade crossing violation while person is operating a CMV.

90 Days Disqualification

First traffic conviction for violating an out-of-service order while person is operating a CMV.

120 Days Disqualification

Three or more serious traffic convictions within three years if person is a CDL holder or if person is operating a CMV. Note: The three-year period will be based on violation date rather than conviction date. Serious traffic convictions include reckless driving, speeding 15 mph or more above the speed limit, improper or erratic lane changes, following too closely, and any moving violation relating to a fatal crash. Serious traffic convictions also include driving a CMV without obtaining a CDL, driving a CMV without CDL in possession, and driving a CMV without proper class of CDL or endorsement/restrictions.

Second railroad/highway grade crossing violation while person is operating a CMV.

180 Days Disqualification

First traffic conviction for operating a CMV while under an out-of-service order.

First traffic conviction for transporting hazardous materials while under an out-of-service order.

First traffic conviction for transporting 15 passengers or more while under an out-of-service order.

1 Year Disqualification

• Driving a CMV with a BAC of 0.04% or higher.

• Driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs if the person is a CDL holder or if person is operating a CMV.

• Refusing blood and/or breath test if the person is a CDL holder or if person is operating a CMV.

• Failing to stop at the scene of an accident if the accident causes injury or death.

• Using a CMV to commit a felony.

• Driving a CMV with a revoked, suspended, canceled, or disqualified privilege.

Causing a fatality through the negligent or criminal operation of a CMV (includes the crimes of motor vehicle manslaughter, homicide by motor vehicle, and negligent homicide).

• Making a false statement on any application for a CDL.

Third or subsequent railroad-highway grade crossing violation within three years while operating a CMV.