Inspections required!

An inspection for Spotted Lantern flies and any egg masses must be completed on your equipment whenever a stop is made in a quarantined county. Be sure to have a copy of the Spotted Lantern fly Permit in your Permit Book.

If you find Spotted Lantern flies or their egg masses on your equipment, you must destroy them prior to completing the form in your tablet. The only way to destroy the egg masses is to scrape them off and place them in a plastic bag of alcohol-based hand sanitizer or rubbing alcohol and then dispose of the bag.

It is a $10,000.00 fine if drivers are caught not performing these inspections when required.

HOW?

When you are stopping in a Spotted Latern fly county, you must fill out the form within your EveryFleet device. To access the form, you simply hit the icon with the bug on it next to the gallery icon and POD icon on your trip information.

If you have any questions, please contact your Driver Manager.

Impacted Counties:

Pennsylvania: Delaware:
Allegheny Kent
Beaver New Castle
Berks
Blair Virginia:
Bucks Clarke
Cambria Frederick
Cameron Warren
Carbon Winchester City
Chester
Columbia New Jersey:
Cumberland Burlington
Dauphin Camden
Delaware Gloucester
Franklin Hunterdon
Huntingdon Mercer
Juniata Salem
Lackawanna Somerset
Lancaster Warren
Lebanon
Lehigh Maryland:
Luzerne Cecil
Miflin Hartford
Monroe
Montgomery
Montour
Northampton
Northumberland
Perry
Philadelphia
Pike
Schuylkill
Wayne
Westmoreland
York

What you need to know:

What is it & why does it matter?

The Spotted Lanternfly or SLF, Lycorma delicatula (White), is an invasive planthopper native to Asia fist discovered in PA in Berks County in 2014.

SLF feeds on sap from a myriad of plants but has a strong preference for plants important to PA’s economy including grapevines, maples, black walnut, birch and willow. SLF’s feeding damage stresses plants which can decrease their heal and in some cases cause death.

Quality of Life can be impacted.

SLF excrete honeydew, a sugary waste that attracts bees, wasps and other insects and this waste build up on any surface below the SLF. The build-up of waste also leads to the growth of sooty mold and black-colored fungi.

How to stop the spread of Spotted Lanternfly

Join the effort to control and prevent the spread of SLF.

Source